Quality Content Doesn’t Just Happen

 In Content Marketing, Marketing Automation, Marketo

Quality Content We all want quality content. But quality content doesn’t just “happen.” You gotta think about it. And work at it. And, most importantly, be willing to take a risk or two. This was my introduction to both Marketo and Marketo Summit and I was duly impressed by both. I find that doesn’t happen often, but perhaps that says more about me than the Summit. But I digress. Already.

Selling over branding, actions over eyeballs.

One of the big benefits of the Summit for me was learning how, where, and when companies approach their content. As it turns out, there are as many ways to approach content strategy as there are companies. There’s also no shortage of platforms and technologies out there (be they Marketo partners or not) to help companies build an engaging and analytical marketing automation system. That’s what makes this space so exciting. There’s really no limit to the ways companies can tell compelling and engaging stories that find, convert and retain the customers they want. The marketing is the experience is the product is the data is the marketing. Analyze, improve, repeat. The second big eye-opener for me was seeing just how big the opportunity is for the Marketing Nation to transform itself into a force for business growth. Consider the following:

  • More than 80% of global marketing executives say marketing needs to change; 29% say that need is urgent.
  • Over three to five years, nearly 80% of companies will classify marketing as a revenue driver.
  • Over the same period, 75% of marketers say they will be responsible for the end-to-end experience over the customer’s lifetime.

These findings came from a new report by the Economist Intelligence Unit entitled “The Rise of the Marketer: Driving Engagement, experience and revenue.” Presented by Economist Global VP of Content Solutions, the report was a fascinating – and energizing – look at an industry in transition. Pundit said the rise of the marketer is not so much an opportunity to wrest control from other departments, but rather an opportunity to infuse marketing thinking into other business functions. It’s a key distinction, and for that reason I’d label the report essential reading.

Delaney_desat_300About the Author: A media junkie and stickler for clarity, Delaney holds an M.A. in Journalism from Western University and an Honours B.A. in French from Brock. When not railing about split infinitives or Oxford commas, he can be found on the soccer pitch or whaling on the heavy bag at his local Muay Thai gym. For best results, he should be kept caffeinated at all times.

Delaney Turner
A media junkie and stickler for clarity, Delaney holds an M.A. in Journalism from Western University and an Honours B.A. in French from Brock. When not railing about split infinitives or Oxford commas, he can be found on the soccer pitch or whaling on the heavy bag at his local Muay Thai gym. For best results, he should be kept caffeinated at all times.
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